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Re: UK Keymap issue



--- Edd Barrett <edd_(_at_)_arameus_(_dot_)_net> wrote:

> Christian Weisgerber wrote:
> 
> >Edd Barrett <edd_(_at_)_arameus_(_dot_)_net> wrote:
> >
> >  
> >
> >>>I have here two x86 machines set up with the uk
> keymap (console not X). 
> >>>holding shift and pressing three should send #.
> It sends # followed by a 
> >>>newline. why is this?
> >>>      
> >>>
> >>It should send a pound sign, but a hash followed
> by \n is sent. The list 
> >>changed the pound sign to a hash for some reason.
> >>    
> >>
> >
> >The top bit got "stripped" (reset to 0).
> >
> >Anyway, the console driver does send a pound sign. 
> This character
> >is not part of (US-)ASCII.  The console produces
> the byte value
> >0xA3, which encodes a pound sign in ISO Latin 1 and
> related character
> >sets.
> >
> >By default, ksh treats characters that have the top
> bit set as
> >Meta-<character & 0x7F>, i.e., in your case the
> pound sign is handled
> >just like the sequence <esc># would be handled. 
> From ksh(1):
> >
> >     comment: ^[#
> >             If the current line does not begin
> with a comment character, one
> >             is added at the beginning of the line
> and the line is entered (as
> >             if return had been pressed);
> otherwise, the existing comment
> >             characters are removed and the cursor
> is placed at the beginning
> >             of the line.
> >
> >So the console is fine, the keymap is fine, it is
> the application
> >that handles the character differently than you
> expect.  For OpenBSD's
> >ksh, there is a switch if you want to use 8-bit
> characters on the
> >command line:
> >
> >$ set +o emacs-usemeta
> >
> >  
> >
> Many thanks for clarifying this.
> 
> Edd
> 
> 

Or you could use vi mode (for vi fans):

$ set -o vi
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