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Re: We are violating RFC1884 and RFC2373



On Tue, Jun 19, 2001 at 01:42:00PM -0500, Hal Snyder wrote:
> Henning Brauer <lists-openbsdtech_(_at_)_bsws_(_dot_)_de> writes: 
> > The RFCs 1884 (standard) and its successor 2373 (proposed standard)
> > are defining a method to bind to IPv4 adresses like
> > ::ffff:127.0.0.1. This is not possible on OpenBSD and NetBSD:
> > 
> >    517 tcpserver6 CALL  bind(0x3,0xdfbfdaa0,0x1c)
> >    517 tcpserver6 RET   bind -1 errno 49 Can't assign requested address
> > 
> > So, the IPv4-in-IPv6 adresses as defined in RFC1884 don't work on
> > OpenBSD. This makes porting IPv6-applications hard, makes the
> > application code more complex if a workaround is introduced and is
> > simply against the RFCs. Saying "supporting IPv4-in-IPv6-addresses
> > makes the code more complex" is not valid here as it simply moves
> > the complexity to the application. This problem is imported from
> > KAME and present in OpenBSD and NetBSD. I don't know about FreeBSD.
> Maybe you've seen the Kame notes at
>   http://orange.kame.net/dev/cvsweb.cgi/kame/IMPLEMENTATION
> or in OpenBSD's
>   /usr/src/sys/netinet6/IMPLEMENTATION
> particularly the table at section 1.12 and OpenBSD section 1.12.5,
> citing "security reasons". Optional in recent NetBSD and FreeBSD, not
> supported in OpenBSD.

Hell, does anyone expect IPv6 migration without some extra work? WE ARE
VIOLATING RFCs. How does this fit with OpenBSDs goal "correctness"???
A lot of IPv6 apps depend on :ffff:ipv4 addresses. they don't work on
OpenBSD, though they are coded RFC compliant. I still do not see any good
reason for violating the RFCs here. "Access control" is no good reason here.
Show examples to prove it is one. Hell, introduce a sysctl switch if you
really want to avoid RFC compliance.
sysctl -w net.inet6.rfccompliance=0. *shrug*

-- 
* Henning Brauer, hostmaster_(_at_)_bsws_(_dot_)_de, http://www.bsws.de *
* Roedingsmarkt 14, 20459 Hamburg, Germany               *
Unix is very simple, but it takes a genius to understand the simplicity.
(Dennis Ritchie)